India

Loksatta editor Girish Kuber's book on Tatas wins award

Loksatta editor Girish Kuber's book on Tatas wins award

The Tatas: How a Family Built a Business and a Nation, a book authored by Loksatta Editor Girish Kuber, has won the inaugural Gaja Capital Business Book Prize. The award was announced at the ‘Gaja Talks’ held on Thursday in Parel.

Kuber’s book was one of the six books shortlisted in the ‘Business Book’ category. The prize has been instituted by Gaja Capital — a private equity firm that provides growth capital to ambitious entrepreneurs — to honour books that celebrate the “romance of entrepreneurship in Indian business”. It carries a cash prize of Rs 15 lakh for the winner and is among India’s most lucrative book awards.

Kuber said, “The book is a tribute to the conglomerate that pioneered the idea of wealth creation with a clear focus on nation-building. Winning the inaugural Gaja Capital Business Book Prize is an extremely proud moment for me for two reasons. First, the subject of the book, the Tatas, is close to my heart. And second, the book was first published in Marathi. This is probably the only example of a business story that originated in a regional language getting a national recognition. For this, I am thankful to HarperCollins and Gaja Capital.”

Speaking about Kuber’s book, Michael Queen, a member of the jury and a global investment professional, said: “This is an epic story spanning 200 years of family, company and national history. This book is a must-read. It’s so well researched and written. The Tata story itself is obviously quite remarkable — a family whose ups and downs are mirrored in the development of India itself. The book covers a vast sweep of history in a fast-paced style that makes the book hard to put down.”

Speaking on ‘Building Champions and Excellence’ at the event, Chief National Coach for the Indian Badminton team, Pullela Gopichand, said that the business world can play a major role in underlining the importance of physical fitness. A Padma Bhusan awardee, Gopichand added that Indians who have traditionally looked towards sports for recreation or physical exercise, unlike in the West, had to change their perspective to view sports as an avenue for competition and winning medals. Sports, he added, was a platform to erase differences between the rich and poor as well as the male and the female.