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Sangathamizhan movie review: A forgettable Vijay Sethupathi film

Sangathamizhan movie review: A forgettable Vijay Sethupathi film

Sangathamizhan movie cast: Vijay Sethupathi, Raashi Khanna

Sangathamizhan movie director: Vijay Chandar

Sangathamizhan movie rating: 1.5 stars

Sangathamizhan is not the kind of film we have come to expect from Vijay Sethupathi. Sangathamizhan is the opposite of the image that the actor has built for himself over the years. Now, the question is why would Sethupathi agree to do this film?

After a point, I felt that Sethupathi must have accepted to perform in this film out of some obligation. Because the film is devoid of any discernible artistic qualities. There are scenes where Sethupathi hardly makes an effort to emote. He is almost sleepwalking in some pivotal moments of the film. These are the moments which usually happen to be the highpoints in typical Rajinikanth and Vijay films, where the stars would deliver adrenaline-pumping punchlines sending the fanboys into a tizzy. But, Sethupathi looks entirely out of place. Probably, deep in his bones, he knows that he became a success story in the film industry because he gave the audience films that were exactly opposite of Sanga Tamizhan. And yet, here we are watching Sethupathi doing the same stuff as other mass heroes.

The film tells the story of Murugan ( Vijay Sethupathi), an aspiring film actor living, needless to say, in north Chennai. He draws the attention of a rich girl and ‘loosu ponnu’ Kamalini (Raashi Khanna). Murugan employs the tricks of the 90s to impress Kamalini. He scolds her on her birthday in full public view. While any girl with a shred of self-respect would have flipped the bird, Kamalini gives her undivided attention to Murugan. And, she is further impressed by his empathy and bottomless wisdom. The daughter of a millionaire is now ready to forgo her wealth and luxury, to live a very ordinary life with Murugan. Such a cliche. And this film is not a love story either. Director Vijay Chandar uses romance as a diversion to mask the hero’s real purpose. Hint: the real plot involves a village, its farmers and their issues.

Let’s talk about the bad guys of the film. Wait. Scratch that. There is nothing worth discussing. You have seen Ravi Kishan and Ashutosh Rana perform the same villainy in every single film that they have done in the south.

There is, however, one feature of the film that I found mildly entertaining. It is not a Vijay Chandar thing. It is a Vijay Sethupathi thing. It felt like Sethupathi had written most of his speaking lines. There is plenty of self-referential jokes relating to Sethupathi’s film career. “If this works out, one can make enough income to draw the attention of the Income Tax Department,” an approximation of what Sethupathi tells in the film. It was almost as if Sethupathi wanted this film to be the Deadpool of mass films. Or maybe it was just me who was trying to find a new meaning in all this loud rehash of all hero-worshipping films made, so far, in Tamil cinema.