Entertainment

Here's why Frozen is not just a children's film

Here's why Frozen is not just a children's film

Animation in movies and shows has come a long way. There was a time when anything animated was just assumed to be a cartoon for kids but with more and more universal themes that click with all age groups, there is no way that an animated feature can be called a kids’ movie. And the same holds true for Frozen as well.

With Frozen 2 releasing on November 22, we try to analyse why Frozen works for all kinds of movie-going audience – kids, teenagers and adults.

We all want to ‘Let it Go’

Frozen’s “Let it Go” is a lyrical masterpiece. The song talks about self-acceptance in such simple terms that even a child could comprehend it. “Let it Go” stresses on the importance of letting go of all fears, embracing your choices and freedom and most of all, it is the motivational anthem that inspires you to break free from your past as Idina Menzel sings “the past is in the past.”

It’s through this song that Elsa learns to embrace her powers and celebrate herself. She builds her own castle and re-imagines her life as the Queen. The teachings imparted by her father which asked her to ‘conceal, don’t feel’ are reversed here as she comes to realise her true strength.

The sisterhood of Arendelle

Frozen was applauded for its representation of true love. While the traditional stereotype suggests that the ‘act of true love’ comes from the romantic partner, Frozen quashed that theory when it stuck to its beliefs and made this story about two sisters who have been through some tough times.

frozen film

Battling age-old stereotypes doesn’t surprise the younger audience as they are yet to get introduced to the clichés. It makes a difference to the older audience and this is what Frozen got right with its renewed perspective.

Finishing each other’s… sandwiches?

Early on in the film, we see Anna fall in love with Hans. Their love story is almost instantaneous which raises a few eyebrows but isn’t too unusual for a Disney princess’ world. You go along for the ride until Hans shows his true colours.

frozen movie

With stories like Rapunzel and Cinderella, we have been conditioned to accept love stories as it is, especially in animated movies. So when a film throws that assumption out the window, it makes us curious. For kids, it serves as a lesson for being cautious and for adults, this failed relationship makes the film tragically relatable.

The Ice Palace of solitude

In the film, Elsa and Anna are separated as kids when the former accidentally hurts her sister with her powers. Though the continue to live in the same palace, they never really spend any time together until Elsa’s coronation. So when Elsa makes her Ice Palace, it’s because she wants to stay alone and not hurt anyone. Anna, on the other hand, wants her sister back so she can end the eternal winter and come back with her to Arendelle.

The film constantly highlights the trajectory of the sisters wherein one believes in togetherness and the other one punishes herself by staying alone. Elsa has never shared the story of her powers with anyone which, for her, are the root of all problems. The film encourages her character to talk and in a way, it’s telling its audience to talk about the problems they might be facing as that’s the first step to solving any problem.

Frozen 2 releases on November 22.